MIS-SOLD INVESTMENTS

DO YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE BEEN MIS-SOLD OR RECEIVED INACCURATE ADVICE FROM A BANK OR ANY FINANICAL INSTITUTION FOR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PRODUCTS?

  • ANY INVESTMENT PRODUCT
  • A PENSION
  • TAX PLANNING
  • A MORTGAGE

If so you could be entitled to a significant compensation payment as recompense.

Our partners already represent thousands of other clients and are recovering enormous amounts of money for them.

 

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR INFO HERE AT NO OBLIGATION WHATSOEVER TO CHECK IF YOU HAVE A POTENTIAL CLAIM:
(By submitting this information you authorise us and our CMC to contact you to discuss any possible claim in further detail).

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE BEEN MIS‑SOLD AN INVESTMENT PRODUCT?

Unfortunately, there is no straight-forward answer to this question. In most cases “mis-selling” means that you were given poor, incomplete, or misleading advice. You may feel the adviser put undue pressure on you to invest in or buy a product that you did not fully understand, perhaps they did not represent the product honestly. Losing money on an investment is not necessarily an indicator of mis-selling.

So where would I start?

If you are not sure, we are happy to look at your case and help you decide whether it would be appropriate to move forward with a claim. Here are some possible examples of mis-selling on investment products:

  • You asked for your money to be invested into a low risk plan but found that it had been invested in higher risk products.
  • The starting value of your investment has decreased, even though you were told that you would not lose any of the original capital invested.
  • It was implied by use of the term “low risk” that you could not lose any of the sum invested.
  • You were not advised how your money was going to be invested.
  • You were not advised of financial penalties for cashing in an investment early.
  • The seller did not explain the risks associated with an investment.
  • Your money was tied-up (inaccessible) in an investment for a longer period than you were advised or expected.
  • You were advised to invest a large sum into a single product, when it would have been safer to spread the sum over several different products.
  • Your investment left you with insufficient funds to cover your usual day to day outgoings.

What investment products could I consider?

Here are some investment products that you may have been impacted by:

  •  U.K. investment bonds
  • Overseas investment bonds
  • Unregulated Collective Investment Schemes (UCIS)
  • Unit trusts
  • Individual Savings Accounts (ISA’s)
  • Store pods *
  • Parking spaces *
  • Commercial property *
  • U.K. land *
  • Overseas Land *

*You may have been advised to invest in these through your pensions as well.

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE BEEN MIS‑SOLD A PENSION PRODUCT?

Unfortunately, there is no straight-forward answer to this question. In most cases “mis-selling” means that you were given poor, incomplete, or misleading advice. You may feel the seller put undue pressure on you to invest in or buy a product that you did not fully understand, perhaps they did not represent the product honestly. Sometimes losing money on an investment is not necessarily an indicator of mis-selling.

So where would I start?

If you are not sure, we are happy to look at your case and help you decide whether it would be appropriate to move forward with a claim. Here are some possible examples of mis-selling on pension products:

  • You were advised to invest in a high-risk pension scheme but were not made aware of the risks, or it was not in line with your financial circumstances at the time.
  • You were advised to transfer a pension but were not properly advised about how the new pension plan would perform compared to your previous plan.
  • You were advised to transfer from a previous scheme even though it was not in your best interests to do so. For example, you may have been encouraged to choose a private scheme over an employer’s scheme, when the employer’s scheme offered additional benefits.
  • You invested into a risky SIPP (Self-Invested Pension Plan) and were not made aware of the risks by your adviser. Some examples of this include investing in: timeshares/villas or apartments overseas (such as Harlequin Property and Freedom Bay); green energy/biofuels (such as Sustainable AgroEnergy), forestry or overseas farming, self-storage units (such as Store Pods), shares in overseas companies, land overseas and residential land in the UK, without planning permission.
  • You were mis-advised regarding contracting out of SERPS (State Earnings Related Pension Scheme). If you were over a certain age (45 for men and 40 for women) and an employee between 1988 and 1997 and were advised to contract out of SERPS to a personal pension plan, you may have been mis-advised.
  • You have paid into a scheme which is now worth less than the money you have invested.
  • You have been sold an annuity and the provider didn’t tell you about the open market option, you were not asked questions about your medical history or lifestyle, or it was not explained what would happen regarding the annuity when you die.

What pension products could I consider?

Here are some pension products that you may have been impacted by:

  • Self-Invested Personal Pension (“SIPP”)
  • Small Self-Administered Scheme (“SSAS”)
  • Personal Pension
  • Transferring personal pensions or occupational pensions to other providers
  • In-specie contributions
  • Occupational pension schemes
  • Section 32 buy-out
  • Funded Unregulated Retirement Benefits Scheme (“FURBS”)
  • Overseas Retirement Benefit Schemes (“ORBS”)

Mis-Sold Tax Planning

Tax planning has been around for hundreds of years and extends from taking advantage of tax free saving accounts that the government issue and making pension contributions, through to more elaborate schemes that you may have been introduced to via your financial adviser, accountant, tax adviser or, a mixture of all of them. They may have come with verbal assurances that all is above board, and cannot go wrong, and it is not unusual for impressive glossy brochures to accompany such schemes;

  • Overseas personal and commercial property
  • Bio fuels
  • Employee benefit trusts
  • Disguised remunerations schemes

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE BEEN MIS‑SOLD A MORTGAGE PRODUCT?

Unfortunately, there is no straight-forward answer to this question. In most cases “mis‑selling” means that you were given poor, incomplete, or misleading advice. You may feel the seller put undue pressure on you to invest in or buy a product that you did not fully understand, perhaps they did not represent the product honestly. Losing money on an investment is not necessarily an indicator of mis-selling.

So where would I start?

If you are not sure, we are happy to look at your case and help you decide whether it would be appropriate to move forward with a claim. Here are some possible examples of mis‑selling on mortgage products:

  • You were sold an interest only mortgage with no suitable repayment vehicle in place – i.e. no means of repaying the debt at the end of the mortgage term.
  • Your mortgage term continues after your retirement date and you have insufficient funds to meet repayments on your retirement income.
  • You were advised to switch mortgage lenders but were not informed about the fees and penalties involved.
  • You were encouraged to “self-certify” – i.e. you were not required to provide evidence of your income (sometimes also known as a “Fast Track” mortgage), without being made aware this could mean paying a higher rate of commission to the seller and more interest on your mortgage.
  • You were advised to re-mortgage to consolidate your debts (add outstanding loans and credit card debts to your mortgage) without being told that it could take you longer to settle the debt and that it would cost you more in the long term.
  • You were not told the amount of commission the seller would receive from the mortgage lender.

What mortgage products could I consider?

Here are some mortgage products that you may have been impacted by:

  • Interest-only
  • Equity Release
  • Buy to Let mortgages
  • Non-status mortgages (Self-Certification, Self-Status)
  • Commercial
  • Non-standard
The third party company we engage with operates on a “no win, no fee” basis. This means in the event that your claim is successful they will charge you a fee of 25% (plus VAT) of the successful claim amount. If your case is unsuccessful, the CMC will not charge you a fee.
Please note that you are entitled to cancel your claim free of charge within 14 days of signing the CMC’s agreement. If you terminate your contract after 14 days and the CMC has made your claim and is successful, you may be required to pay a fee of 25% plus VAT of the successful claim amount.
The documents the CMC will send you to sign will also clearly state their fees.
There is nothing at all to pay to Riteway Claims Limited (trading as ‘Amiowedmoney’) as our remuneration comes directly from our partnership with our CMC. We are paid a fee by our CMC for the introduction if they accept your case.